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The Harjul

The Harjul

Sunday, 2nd Apr 2017 (Sudanow) - Harjul is Scientifically called solenostemma argel, it is of the creeping species, a wild plant that is wide-spread in North Sudan. The tree is 2.5 meters high with a velvet green stalk, simple alternate leaves, each 4.2 centimeters long, a sharp point and smooth edges and the seeds kept in a smooth white case of a length ranging between 6 – 10 centimeters.  

Harjul is cheap and is found in every Sudanese house for primary health care needs. The water in which the bitter leaves are boiled is used for the treatment of colic, particularly during the period or in birth, stomach-ache, appetizer and digestive. It is also used for evicting gases and treating kidney inflammation and rheumatism.

It has also proved effective in the treatment of diabetes. A woman told SUDANOW reporter that her husband, a diabetic, once found that his diabetes was above 400 and as the doctor is not reachable, she boiled Harjul and made him drink from the syrup several times before arrival of the doctor. Undergoing examination later on, it was found out that the diabetes has dropped to the normal rate.

According to a Sdanese study, in agreement  with  others  reported  elsewhere, harjul leaves are effective in decreasing the high serum cholesterol. Harjul is also used for the treatment of measles after it is ground.

 

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